Insights from Guardian ‘Small Charities’ Q&A – June 20th 2014

Tuesday 24th June, 2014

Small Dog Next To Big Dog

When we spotted that the Guardian was running a live Q&A session for small charities, we knew we had to get involved. ‘How Small Charities Can Have a Big Impact’ brought together a panel of charity experts to answer questions and share advice on how charitable organisations can achieve their goals even with limited resources.

We were particularly interested in the discussion around social media – after all, we’re big believers in social media as a marketing tool for our clients in the third sector. Free to set up, the only ‘cost’ associated with social media is your time, which is why it can be helpful to use free social media management tools such as Hootsuite to help you plan and schedule your content in advance.

With so many social media platforms to choose from, the panel recommended starting with just a few relevant targeted platforms and building from there – for example an email list to keep your donors, volunteers and other interested parties up-to-date with your activity, and a Twitter account to show followers all the great work you’re doing ‘behind the scenes’ and for networking with like-minded organisations.

For small charities that need a little help getting started with social media, the panel suggested contacting your local Council for Voluntary Services or local universities to find out if the faculty or students could offer free social media training. And of course, the Big Cat team would be more than happy to help – why not take a look at the digital strategy we produced with Birmingham Children’s Hospital?

Overall we found the Guardian Q&A to be a useful session with lots of great, actionable ideas from the panel of charity experts. Thanks guys!

Small Dog Next To Big Dog

When we spotted that the Guardian was running a live Q&A session for small charities, we knew we had to get involved. ‘How Small Charities Can Have a Big Impact’ brought together a panel of charity experts to answer questions and share advice on how charitable organisations can achieve their goals even with limited resources.

We were particularly interested in the discussion around social media – after all, we’re big believers in social media as a marketing tool for our clients in the third sector. Free to set up, the only ‘cost’ associated with social media is your time, which is why it can be helpful to use free social media management tools such as Hootsuite to help you plan and schedule your content in advance.

With so many social media platforms to choose from, the panel recommended starting with just a few relevant targeted platforms and building from there – for example an email list to keep your donors, volunteers and other interested parties up-to-date with your activity, and a Twitter account to show followers all the great work you’re doing ‘behind the scenes’ and for networking with like-minded organisations.

For small charities that need a little help getting started with social media, the panel suggested contacting your local Council for Voluntary Services or local universities to find out if the faculty or students could offer free social media training. And of course, the Big Cat team would be more than happy to help – why not take a look at the digital strategy we produced with Birmingham Children’s Hospital?

Overall we found the Guardian Q&A to be a useful session with lots of great, actionable ideas from the panel of charity experts. Thanks guys!

Written by Hannah Davies Marketing Director

Tuesday 24th June, 2014