New Brand Identity in the Third Sector

Wednesday 20th July, 2016

Forever Hope Foundation Icon Light

It’s been a while since the Big Cat studio saw any developments in the third sector industry, so when we discovered that London design agency Branch had developed a new brand identity for the Forever Hope Foundation (a company that raises funds and awareness for charities) it immediately piqued our interest.

Branch has described Forever Hope Foundation as being a “secondary” brand, therefore they have adopted a minimalist approach to avoid a clash in design when paired with their partner logo, also allowing more focus on the latter’s logo. Yet this minimalist approach creates a clinical appearance that isn’t very comforting nor warm (as you would expect something that expresses hope), and the opaque grey used on their stationery is rather illegible. However, the logo looks impressive when applied white-out on a coloured background.

Forever Hope Foundation icon

The monogram combines the “H” and infinity symbol, resembling two people holding hands before being placed within what feels like a superfluous circle. Despite this being an effective monogram, I feel it would’ve worked better being a solid colour as the thin stroke loses prominence to the font pairing of Lineto Circular, and looks especially delicate on their navigation bar.

Forever Hope Foundation and Unicef  brand identity

Branch used Lineto Circular as a main typeface for the overall branding, and its gentle curves soften the clinical appearance led by the grey and white colour palette. This is paired with Baskerville for a sophisticated touch, although there isn’t any sign of it in their stationery… Perhaps they’ll release more marketing materials that would show this combination of typefaces, or maybe it’s only for internal documents? It would’ve been nice to see Baskerville being used especially because they’ve highlighted it.

Forever Hope Foundation brand identity on stationary

All in all, the design team at Big Cat are eager to see this logo being used and becoming more well-known as the new brand identity concept has real potential to grow. What are your thoughts? 

Forever Hope Foundation Icon Light

It’s been a while since the Big Cat studio saw any developments in the third sector industry, so when we discovered that London design agency Branch had developed a new brand identity for the Forever Hope Foundation (a company that raises funds and awareness for charities) it immediately piqued our interest.

Branch has described Forever Hope Foundation as being a “secondary” brand, therefore they have adopted a minimalist approach to avoid a clash in design when paired with their partner logo, also allowing more focus on the latter’s logo. Yet this minimalist approach creates a clinical appearance that isn’t very comforting nor warm (as you would expect something that expresses hope), and the opaque grey used on their stationery is rather illegible. However, the logo looks impressive when applied white-out on a coloured background.

Forever Hope Foundation icon

The monogram combines the “H” and infinity symbol, resembling two people holding hands before being placed within what feels like a superfluous circle. Despite this being an effective monogram, I feel it would’ve worked better being a solid colour as the thin stroke loses prominence to the font pairing of Lineto Circular, and looks especially delicate on their navigation bar.

Forever Hope Foundation and Unicef  brand identity

Branch used Lineto Circular as a main typeface for the overall branding, and its gentle curves soften the clinical appearance led by the grey and white colour palette. This is paired with Baskerville for a sophisticated touch, although there isn’t any sign of it in their stationery… Perhaps they’ll release more marketing materials that would show this combination of typefaces, or maybe it’s only for internal documents? It would’ve been nice to see Baskerville being used especially because they’ve highlighted it.

Forever Hope Foundation brand identity on stationary

All in all, the design team at Big Cat are eager to see this logo being used and becoming more well-known as the new brand identity concept has real potential to grow. What are your thoughts? 

Written by Hannah Davies Marketing Director

Wednesday 20th July, 2016